Pesticides

  • Hawaii bans use of harmful pesticide

    Christopher Pala
    | 18th June 2018
    The government of Hawaii - once a defender of the GM corn industry - has passed a law that forces agro-chemical companies to disclose what pesticides they spray. It has also become the first US state to ban the chlorpyrifos, which has been linked to brain damage in babies. Christopher Pala reports

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  • Bee on blossom

    Campaigners rejoice European Union neonicotinoid ban

    Catherine Early
    | 30th April 2018
    Bee-killing insecticides will face a near total ban in Europe following a vote by member states in favour of proposals by the European Commission. The UK government supported the ban, which it says it will maintain after Brexit. CATHERINE EARLY reports

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  • The Lemur Catta Face Lemur is one of many animals endemic to Madagascar, where over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth.

    Ambatovy: a tale of reverse development?

    Laurence Soustras
    | 23rd November 2017
    A planned nickel mine in Madagasca has led to numerous environmental problems, and whilst the mine continues to struggle the environmental concerns surrounding the project continue to grow. LAURENCE SOUSTRAS investigates.

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  • Brexit is not a good time to be a British bee - claims Green MEP

    Molly Scott Cato MEP
    | 3rd July 2017
    Bees in Britain are looking enviously at their EU neighbours. The EU is set to extend a ban on neonicotinoid pesticides - but agri-chemical lobbyists have the ear of pro-Brexit Tories, argues Molly Scott Cato MEP. The member of the European Parliament’s Agricultural Committee responds to our report in The Ecologist on Friday about new corporate funded research confirming the threat to bees. She argues it is now time to redouble our efforts to protect our vital pollinators.

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  • Were the mice in the 2001 Kumar study suffering from an oncogenic virus infection? There's no evidence that they were. Photo: Mouse (Mus musculus) by George Shuklin (talk) via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).

    EFSA dismissed glyphosate cancer study after unsupported 'viral infection' slur of ex-EPA official

    Claire Robinson
    GMWatch
    | 25th May 2017
    A 2001 study that showed that glyphosate caused cancer in mice was ignored by the EFSA after the unsubstantiated allegation of a former US-EPA official that the mice used in the study were suffering from a viral infection that might have given them cancer, writes Claire Robinson. The EFSA failed to properly investigate the allegation, which appears to originate in a document linked to Monsanto, maker of the world's top-selling herbicide, glyphosate-based Roundup.

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  • Spot the difference: Monsanto's new 'Glyphosate-free' Roundup product, now on sale in Germany, and a bottle of vinegar. Photo: Dr Helmut Burtscher / GMWatch.

    Monsanto's new 'glyphosate-free' Roundup is vinegar!

    Claire Robinson
    GMWatch
    | 8th May 2017
    Has Monsanto, dubbed the 'world's most evil corporation', turned a new leaf? It has taken the 'probably carcinogenic' glyphosate out of a new version of its market leading 'Roundup' herbicide, and replaced it with vinegar. The bad news is it's only available in Austria. That, and it may still contain toxic 'adjuvants' to increase its effectiveness.

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  • Back to the future? Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square, London, in the Great Fog of 1952. Photo: N T Stobbs via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).

    Conservatives' hard right Brexit plans: UK's great leap backwards to 'dirty man of Europe'

    Brendan Montague
    | 27th April 2017
    It's barely mentioned in the election campaign or reported in the media. But a powerful faction of Tory ministers, ex-ministers and backbench MPs are bent on using Brexit to ignite a massive bonfire of 'spirit-crushing' laws on wildlife protection, air and water pollution, pesticides, renewable energy and public health, writes Brendan Montague. At risk are not just EU directives and regulations but even the UK's own Climate Change Act. May's Brexit may not just be hard, but very, very dirty.

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  • How it all began: Monsanto Tribunal Opening day, 14th October 2016. Photo: Monsanto Tribunal via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

    Tribunal judges: Monsanto isn't feeding the world - it's undermining food security

    Claire Robinson
    GMWatch
    | 24th April 2017
    Five international judges say Monsanto's activities have negatively affected individuals, communities and biodiversity, writes Claire Robinson. The Monsanto Tribunal's damning ruling denounces the company's harmful impacts on food sovereignty, agricultural production, access to nutrition, the natural environment, seed diversity, climate change, pollution and traditional cultural practices.

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  • Organic beetroot grown at Sandy lane Farm, Oxfordshire: good for you, the farmer, wildlife and the wider environment. Photo: Sandy lane Farm via Facebook.

    We need more organic farming!

    Peter Melchett
    Soil Association
    | 23rd March 2017
    A new study sets out the huge benefits of organic farming to people and the environment, writes Peter Melchett, including more wildlife, healthier consumers and farm workers, lower greenhouse gas emissions, reduced soil erosion and increased water retention. We need more of it, fast!

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  • The 'pro-science' chemical industry boosters have a guilty secret: they are funded by the same 'anti-science' right-wing foundations that finance climate change denialism. Photo: Sucralose packaging by Mike Mozart via Flickr (CC BY).

    Propaganda wars: 'pro-science' GMO, chemicals boosters funded by climate change deniers

    Stacy Malkan
    | 28th February 2017
    They promote GMOs, defend toxic chemicals, and attack people who raise concerns about those products as 'anti-science'. But behind the slick 'astroturf' PR fronts lurk some very dubious funders: the same arch-conservative foundations that finance climate science denial. Stacy Malkan exposes the key players in the agribusiness and chemical industry propaganda wars.

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  • Factory in Perafita, Porto, Portugal. Photo: José Moutinho via Flickr (CC BY).

    How a toxic spill and a book launched Britain's environmental movement - the forgotten story

    John Clark
    University of St Andrews
    | 22nd February 2017
    The mass poisoning of farm animals in Kent in 1963 was traced to a factory where a pesticide developed as a WWII chemical warfare agent was manufactured, writes John Clark. The event, so close to the publication of Rachel Carson's 'Silent Spring', galvanised a growing ecological awareness - all the more so as the government's only wish was to hush the matter up.

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